Skip to content
Scholarship with a Shepherd’s Heart

OT620: Old Testament Textual Criticism

BOOK LIST

Primary Sources

  • Elliger, K., and W. Rudolph, et al., eds. Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. 5th ed. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 1967/77, 1997.
  • The available volumes in the Biblia Hebraica Quinta series (German Bible Society; 2004–present).
  • Rahlfs, Alfred, ed. Septuaginta Id est Vetus Testamentum graece iuxta LXX interpres. 2 vols. in one. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 1935, 1979, 2004, 2007 (Rahlfs-Hanhart edition).
  • The available volumes in the Septuaginta Vetus Testamentum Graecum series (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht; 1935–present)

Secondary Sources (*required)

  • Carr, David M. The Formation of the Hebrew Bible: A New Reconstruction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.
  • *Lange, Armin and Emanuel Tov. Textual History of the Bible: The Hebrew Bible: Volume 1A Overview Articles. Leiden: Brill, 2016.
  • Rollston, Christopher A. Writing and Literacy in the World of Ancient Israel: Epigraphic Evidence from the Iron Age. Atlanta: SBL Press, 2010.
  • Schniedewind, William M. How the Bible Became a Book: The Textualization of Ancient Israel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.
  • Schniedewind, William M. The Finger of the Scribe: How Scribes Learned to Write the Bible. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019.
  • Toorn, Karel Van Der. Scribal Culture and the Making of the Hebrew Bible. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2007.

Begin Your Training

Join a community of students and train for Christ-centered ministry for the building up of healthy churches in Phoenix and the world.

PHX SEM Blog

Subscribe and receive great content from scholars and pastors.

White-letter

602-850-8000
7901 East Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85260
© Phoenix Seminary

Institutional Policies

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

Non-Discrimination Policy

Phoenix Seminary does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin, sex, disability, or age. Phoenix Seminary admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin, sex, disability, or age in administration of its educational policies, school-administered programs, student admissions, financial aid, or employment.